Salmorejo Cordobés

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Cool, wet and overcast October days like today remind us all that tomatoes are on their way out. Ok, I’ll admit it…they’re basically gone. Sure, you can find them here and there if someone has a heated greenhouse or a seasonal high tunnel–like us–that they’re growing tomatoes in, but now all we really have to look forward to (?) are hydroponic versions of this red fruitable that many call a toe-may-toe (i.e. what many of us will be buying at our local supermarket soon/now/ugh). No, not the tomtato (<--check that link out) but the watered-down version of the essence of summer, Italy and patio gardens. I respect hydroponic agriculture of course, but I'll never be able to convince myself that their products taste the same as those that spent most of their time out in the weather and in the dirt. You know, 'REAL' tomatoes! But I digress..... Who or what is this Salmorejo Cordobés? Well, a good friend of the farm let me know that such a thing existed, and when she described it to me I was instantly hungry and eager to make this dish. First of all, I should give credit where it is due, so for the full details on Señor Cordobés please head over to Bon Appetit.

What is it? Soup. Soup? Yes, but to call it a soup really doesn’t do it any justice in how your brain and/or taste buds will interpret it. It might be helpful to know that “Salmorejo” is a Spanish synonym for “Gazpacho” and “Cordobes” is referring to Cordoba, a city in southern Spain where–funny enough–Gazpacho originated. Buuuut, there’s just something more to it. It ‘is’ simple as delicious food goes, and it fits nicely into the newly discovered culinary world of ‘simple’ that seems to be focused on allowing you to taste what, exactly, is in the dish. In the end though, for me, it is one of the few recipes that really got me excited this summer and boy/girl did it deliver!

I’m sure that you’ll enjoy it, if you can find any tomatoes anyway, and I know that you can make it. Yes, even those of you who think you can’t cook at all or you burn everything (did I mention you don’t cook this soup?). If you do try it, let us know what you think. I’m sure your soul will thank you.

In closing, a BIG “Thank You!” to Magda who brought Señor Cordobés into our lives.