Comments on The Elephant At The Market Pasture Raised Meats • Honey • Vegetables • Eggs & more 2016-03-19T15:37:13Z http://www.namimoonfarms.com/news/the-elephant-at-the-market/feed/atom/ By: Nami Moon Website Nami Moon Website http://www.namimoonfarms.com/?p=821#comment-56466 2016-03-19T15:37:13Z 2016-03-19T15:37:13Z We have rules about locally grown stuff, but it’s hard to enforce those rules. There’s no real protocol for it. This year, I think some of us are just going to take it upon ourselves to identify our products as locally grown and then try to find a way to clearly identify each other in the market so that we stand out. At the very least, I hope it starts a conversation or ten.

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By: Margie Margie http://www.namimoonfarms.com/?p=821#comment-56135 2016-02-08T16:26:50Z 2016-02-08T16:26:50Z I participate in a farmer’s market. Yes we grow our own vegetables. We also have vendors that sell other items, breads, pastery and jelly. But that is the extent of other items offered. Most of us try to keep our prices together. But have vendor(s) that try to undercut prices. Have had customers o ask if there was something wrong with the vegetable. I had the same question but never voiced it. Nothing that is not locally grown or cooked can be sold. No “flee market” items.

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By: Nami Moon Website Nami Moon Website http://www.namimoonfarms.com/?p=821#comment-55999 2016-01-22T13:21:35Z 2016-01-22T13:21:35Z That sounds like an incredible operation! I’m sure anyone who has worked with you has benefited a great deal. You’re right about people wanting convenience, but I think cooking is making a comeback (a little). There do seem to be people who are interested in things like preserving food again (including myself). It’s kind of crazy to me to see that within two generations we forgot a LOT of knowledge about food, food prep and food preservation. I’m not sure if that’s because of convenience, effective marketing or both. Thanks for sharing your thoughts : )

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By: Sharon Carson Sharon Carson http://www.namimoonfarms.com/?p=821#comment-55997 2016-01-22T05:52:56Z 2016-01-22T05:52:56Z I love your post . I have been growing our food on this homeastead for about 40 years and I have seen the changes in the market as well as CSA movement . I grow my own rabbit and chicken for meat so I can be sure of the ethics and quality .
I also barter with other local growers that I know personally and have visited their farms .
i eat well and have not been sick in a long time . I have offered a program here where only about 10 peopople can join my garden and work together to grow foods for themselves co-operatively. It still cost money,about the same as a csa . They also need to commit at least 3 hours /week for the program but they can also learn to grow heir own foods make compost, start seeds, plan a garden and preserve foods for winter . It is an educational CSA that requires labor and comittment and being part of a team or community. There is no question of where the food is from or how its grown . I am 68 years old and have gardened 60 of those years always without chemicals so I know a little. I know I can’t afford to hire anyone and can’t do all the work alone to feed 10 families. It sure seems like a good solution to me but it sure swims against the stream of people expecting cheap food already washed and cut up for them …..

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By: Tamara Tamara http://www.namimoonfarms.com/?p=821#comment-55995 2016-01-21T20:30:04Z 2016-01-21T20:30:04Z Thanks for the article. There isn’t much that bothers a farmer more than another supplier trying to pretend they grew what they are selling. In MN most markets are producer only but the big one in Minneapolis isn’t. They have all the tropical fruits an ethnic supermarket has. They say it is for convenience. I think it is imperative to teach consumers about seasonal eating and having convenience bananas and lemons for them at market doesn’t teach anything. Eating what is truly local reduces pollution and helps the earth. It also tastes better. Some consumers just don’t have the same feelings about this as farmers. The aggregate CSAs just make sense to them. They are not thinking about supporting a farm or farms going belly up because of not getting support. There is a CSA near me that buys in all her produce and then packs and distributes. All she is is a delivery vehicle. It drives me crazy. I have looked at the satellite images too! But one day when someone brought this business up and I ranted about it, they just started at me and asked why it bothers me so much.

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By: Nami Moon Website Nami Moon Website http://www.namimoonfarms.com/?p=821#comment-55994 2016-01-21T20:25:29Z 2016-01-21T20:25:29Z Yeah. If I had access to the chart, I would change it. I can bring it up to CIAS, though. That, or check and see if they have anything updated. I think it’s hard to make a chart that captures everything, too. At best, I’d say that the chart is a guide for starters and then, if someone is selling berries in Fall, they can ask and learn about different types of strawberries, etc. I think people will learn far more from these types of conversations than any chart anyone could ever make. In the meantime, I’ll see what I can do about further clarifying that people *can* and do pull off some amazing crops when they’re not supposed to be able to given conventional wisdom.

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By: Tamara Tamara http://www.namimoonfarms.com/?p=821#comment-55993 2016-01-21T20:21:35Z 2016-01-21T20:21:35Z I also think strawberries on these sorts of charts should be altered. A great many farmers grow day neutral strawberries and have them until frost outside. I bring more to market in fall than June. In June the members get the berries and in late summer and fall they go to market.

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By: Nami Moon Website Nami Moon Website http://www.namimoonfarms.com/?p=821#comment-55992 2016-01-21T19:30:52Z 2016-01-21T19:30:52Z Bananas! That’s funny. I will say that there exists at least one high tunnel in Kansas where bananas are being grown, but aside from the novelty of having them in there, I don’t think they are sold in any great amounts. It’s actually quite incredible what some farms are pulling off in cold climates, but yeah, we have to ask to find out more. Then again, I wouldn’t have asked about the bananas either 🙂

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By: Nami Moon Website Nami Moon Website http://www.namimoonfarms.com/?p=821#comment-55991 2016-01-21T19:29:23Z 2016-01-21T19:29:23Z Thanks for sharing the piece! 🙂 I think it does tend to be kind of clear who is trucking things in, but not always. Along those lines though, trucking stuff in already happens, right? If I sell a peach I trucked in from Georgia, how is that any different than a similar peach trucked in from Georgia that’s being sold at Pick N’ Save? Probably the only difference would be the price. It does bring something to market that farmers in Wisconsin usually don’t produce, so I guess the question is why do people go to farmers markets? It’s interesting that we used to eat by the season not too long ago, but now that we can ship strawberries from Argentina to Oshkosh, people often extend that expectation of what’s available at the supermarket to the farmers market. Similarly, people often gasp at the fact that we drive a little under an hour to bring our wares to market. That’s pretty close to average I’d say, but people are shocked that we would do it. What’s funny to me is that no one bats an eye at those strawberries from Argentina that have traveled 6,000 miles. Same for everything else in a supermarket, which has traveled much further than anything you’ll see at a farmers market. I hear ya though. Eating seasonally in Wisconsin would be more limited than a lot of people would want, at least during the winter.

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By: Sarah River Sarah River http://www.namimoonfarms.com/?p=821#comment-55988 2016-01-21T16:53:15Z 2016-01-21T16:53:15Z Thank you for writing this! Yes, definitely the elephant in the room.

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